editors-blog-entry3My two-year lease on my 2014 Nissan LEAF runs out on Feb. 22, 2016. I want to continue driving electric, but I can’t continue with a car with so little range because the LEAF is my only car (I’ve twice run out of charge, both times in winter).

I really want a 2017 LEAF, or a 2017 Bolt, but I need to cover the time between Feb. 22, 2016 and when the 2017 Bolt or 2017 LEAF become available in Colorado.

The 2016 LEAF, with 107 EPA miles, doesn’t have enough range for me. And the First Generation Volt is not an option because my 11 and 9-year-old daughters hate the back seat. The 2016 Volt won’t be available in Colorado until late spring (supposedly).



Any ideas for tips/ideas on what I can/should do in order to keep driving electric from Feb. 22, 2016 until the “real” and affordable EVs arrive in Colorado?

Thank you 🙂

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My 2014 Nissan LEAF, which I’ve leased for two years, needs to be returned to Boulder Nissan in Boulder, Colo. soon — and I need to figure out what to do so I can continue to drive electric until the affordable EVs with enough range to be single cars in a single-car household such as mine come out.

5 Responses

  1. fbicknel

    I recently entered a 4-year lease on a 2015 LEAF, so I’ll be in a similar situation come November of 2019. So far away. *sigh*

    It sounds to me you need another 2-year lease to get you out to the 150+ mile 2017 or 2018 model. 🙂 But I guess you have to ask yourself: are you willing to go back to burning old animals to get around or are you committed to the cause?

    It would be a hard decision for me, Now, however, I still have new-car smell muddling my brain, making me unqualified to make such decisions.

    Reply
    • Christof Demont-Heinrich

      Thank you for your reply. At this point, it’s down to a used Chevy Volt, 2012 or 2013, or, possibly a 3-year lease on a BMW i3 rEx. The BMW would be more expensive, for sure, across 3 years, but I think it would be a lot more fun — and it has a lot more room for my 11 and 9 year old daughters in the back seat than a Volt. The i3 rEx wouldn’t be as practical as a Volt for long-distance driving, although people have used it for long distances http://www.bmwblog.com/2014/12/18/462-mile-bmw-i3-rex-road-trip-new-jersey-vermont/. I’d also have to pay extra to get 12,000 miles per year (the standard lease = 10,000 miles per year). I did three test drives of three different used Volts last week. After two years of pure electric driving, it is kind of disappointing when the gas generator kicks in, and it was also disappointing, but also not surprising, how quickly the Volt battery dropped range in 30-degree temperatures. But, I have to say, I’m also tired of worrying if my LEAF will get me, and my kids, where we want to go — we’ve twice run out of charge, both times in the winter. I hope to try a i3 rEx this week.

      Reply
  2. Robert Ford

    I have a 2013 Leaf that comes off lease April 1 so I am facing a similar situation. Boulder Nissan may be willing to extend your lease for a while as they have suggested that to me. I would want a lower monthly payment since I would be leasing an older car than when it was new.

    My Leaf is my only car and I use eGo CarShare vehicles when I need a second car, longer range or more carrying capacity than the Leaf has. My 2001 Toyota Sienna has been “loanated” to eGo so my credits cover any use of their cars.

    Perhaps the 2016 Leaf would work for you if you could back it up with car sharing.

    Reply
    • Christof Demont-Heinrich

      Hmmm…Boulder Nissan told me Nissan is not doing any lease extensions for any Nissan models when I asked about an extension. You are correct that I could rent a car, etc. for longer trips. But the extra effort involved somehow means that I just end up not doing the trips to the mountains, etc. — at least that’s what happened the last two years while I’ve had the LEAF as my only car.

      Reply

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