My 2014 Nissan LEAF being towed due to a flat tire. The Bridgestone Ecopia tires on my LEAF are wearing out at three times the predicted wear rate.

My 2014 Nissan LEAF being towed due to a flat tire. The Bridgestone Ecopia tires on my LEAF are wearing out at three times the predicted wear rate.

Count me among the many people who are very disappointed in the Bridgestone Ecopia tires that come with the 2014 Nissan LEAF, and, presumably, other years of the LEAF as well. [See this long MyNissanLeaf.Com forum thread for evidence of how many people are unhappy with the LEAF’s OEM tires.]

The tires are wearing at a rate I’ve never seen any other tire wear — and I’ve driven hundreds of thousands of miles in other cars in my 32 years of driving!

At 18,000 miles the Bridgestones on the LEAF look like they’ve been driven twice that far. In fact, due to a flat tire — which the guys at Discount Tire said was not repairable, I had to replace the rear two tires on my LEAF! This,with six months to go on my two-year, 24,000-mile lease.




LEAF a heavy car
I have a strong feeling that the premature tire wear is due to the LEAF’s extra weight. At 3,300 or so pounds, my LEAF is nearly 1,000 pounds heavier than the 1992 Acura Integra I drove for 21 years before I leased my LEAF.

It could have something to do with the Ecopia tires too: The sales guy at Discount Tire said he never recommends Bridgestones. But the Ecopia’s are rated to 65,000 miles, and they should not, absolutely should not!, be going already at just 18,000 miles.

Also, I know it’s due to the desire to reduce weight, but two big thumbs down to Nissan for not including a spare for the LEAF. I had to have my LEAF towed to Discount Tire because of the lack of a spare  — though, lucky for me, my LEAF was in my garage, not on the side of the road.

Yes, there is a tire repair kit in the trunk. But I’m not going to fool around with that, sorry. And the guy at Discount said using the kit voids any tire warranty, though, he also said that tire manufacturers typically don’t honor tire warranties on OEM tires anyway.

In any case, while electric cars produce fewer maintenance costs than gasoline cars — up to this point, I had invested in only wiper blades and windshield fluid — if my experience and that of others is any indication, you can count on having to replace your tires more often in an EV than in a gas car.

 

9 Responses

  1. Ramon A. Cardona

    Thanks for the report. I have a 2011 Leaf with different tires that are doing well at 32,000 miles. Sorry about the issues with the ones in your Leaf. Of course, I trust you have claimed the tire guarantee with Bridegestone Tire Co. as to tire wear?

    Reply
    • Lester Burnham (@paymeinbeahhh)

      So what kinda tires do you have that are at 32k mi? Oem? Per the bridgestone dealer the guarantee is predicated on the entire tread being worn not just the outer edge (which may indicate an alignment issue, w/is not the case here of course) so im SOL here.

      Reply
  2. Lester Burnham (@paymeinbeahhh)

    The Bridgestones on my 13 Leaf are indeed basic “small car” tires. “OEM” doesnt mean they are good; it means they were cheap/just good enough and so Nissan paired them to the Leaf. The dealer service guy admitted that thicker tires, which would be better able to carry the added EV weight, would wear a lot less. Im right under 19K miles and the dealer said i could get 4 new ones for $436 but i didnt ask what kind. Will look at the tire warranty but do i want another 4 ecopias? No.

    Reply
  3. leaf-

    having the same issues too. The front tires are worn like crazy. I asked Nissan service center to rotate tires to the back and they said they won’t do it and instead was told to have the tires replaced. Our Leaf just almost 2 years about 22K miles.

    Reply
    • Lester Burnham (@paymeinbeahhh)

      Well ive had my tires rotated every 6 months/3-4000 miles and they are still worn harshly. One should ALWAYS rotate tires at least annually/7-8000 miles anyways u know. Closing in on 20k miles. I can feel the wear indicators bump-bump-bump at freeway speeds. Hello tirerack….

      Reply
    • Lester Burnham (@paymeinbeahhh)

      Then you probably will have a set of tires that will wear longer than the 22k i got, assuming you rotate and check inflation regularly. How much longer? Depends on what your style of driving is.

      The downside? Im getting about 10% LESS mileage on these new kumhos — 4.8 kw/mi on worn bridgestone ecopias vs current 4.3 or so. Tires may not be fully broken in yet but regarldess i figure it will just mean i will recharge more often and/or have less range.

      Reply
  4. Noah

    2015 Leaf here. Had to replace front ecopias at 12k and got immediate alignment. Now at 18k the old rears, now in front for last 6k, are shot. Its not the alignment though its still, like before, the outer edge. I care less about range than replacing tires every 6 months. Any tire recommendations?

    Reply
    • Lester Burnham (@paymeinbeahhh)

      Get a tire with a higher treadwear rating. My kumhos soluses are rated at 600 vs bridgestones 400. Then perhaps look at the load index — what the tire is rated for in terms of carrying weight. With its batteries the leaf is husky for its size. Im also inflating the tires to 40 psi vs 35 in the maybe vain attempt to minimize the outer treadwear issue.

      I rotated fairly aggressively — every 6 months/3-4K miles and got 22K after the dealer said they werent going to rotate anymore because of alleged heavy wear. (Hey i didnt see the belts yet!) I might have eeked out a couple more thousand miles but it just gets less safe from there.

      Trading fuel savings for having to buy $500 in new tires every 3 years is not what we signed up for. Good luck!

      Reply

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